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Table 1 Association of signalment and historical data with hyperthyroidism in 507 cats 10 years and older presented to primary care veterinary practices in the greater Dublin area

From: Prevalence and risk factors for hyperthyroidism in Irish cats from the greater Dublin area

   All cats (n = 507) Euthyroid cats (n = 346) Hyperthyroid cats (n = 107)    
Variable   na % na % na % OR CI P
Age 10 - < 12 121 24.6 94 28.1 16 15.4
≥12 - <14 130 26.5 96 28.7 23 22.1
≥14 240 48.9 145 43.3 65 62.5 0.0019b
Sex Male 196 42.0 141 44.3 39 38.6 0.78 0.49–1.24 0.3563
Female 271 58.0 177 55.7 62 61.4    
Breed Crossbreed 461 97.3 316 96.9 95 97.9 1.50 0.32–6.97 0.747
Purebreed 13 2.7 10 3.1 2 2.1    
Lifestyle Indoor only 105 21.2 74 21.9 16 15.1
Outdoor only 23 4.6 16 4.7 5 4.8
Indoor and Outdoor 368 74.2 248 73.4 83 79.8 0.349
Parasite control Frequent or infrequent 350 76.62 244 77.7 68 72.3 0.75 0.44–1.26 0.3317
Never 107 23.4 70 22.3 26 27.7    
Vaccination Frequent or infrequent 346 76.5 241 77.7 67 72.0 0.73 0.43–1.24 0.2669
Never 106 23.5 69 22.3 26 28.0    
Feeding habits
Access to dry food Yes 310 63.9 208 63.0 69 67.6 1.22 0.76–1.96 0.411
No 175 36.1 122 37.0 33 32.4    
Fed ring pull Yes 179 52.0 119 50.6 39 52.7 1.08 0.64–1.83 0.7907
No 165 48.0 116 29.4 35 47.3    
  1. arefers to number of cases where recorded
  2. blogistic regression analysis (see text for exact results)
  3. Chi-squared was used to analyse data with more than two categories (age and lifestyle). Fisher’s exact test with odds ratio calculation was used for all other analyses